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Libraries and the Long Tail (20 Apr 2006)
Discussions of the long tail that I have seen or heard in the library community strike me as somewhat partial. Much of that discussion is about how libraries contain deep and rich collections, and about how their system-wide aggregation represents a very long tail of scholarly and cultural materials (a system may be at the level of a consortium, or a state, or a country). However, I am not sure that we have absorbed the real relevance of the long tail argument, which is about how well supply and demand are matched in a network environment. It is not enough for materials to be present within the system: they have to be readily accessible ('every reader his or her book', in Ranganathan's terms), potentially interested readers have to be aware of them ('every book its reader'), and the system for matching supply and demand has to be efficient ('save the time of the user') [1].

Think of two numbers in this context. One is about interlibrary lending (the flow of materials between libraries), and the other is about circulation (the flow of materials within a library).
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Article URL: http://www.dlib.org/dlib/april06/dempsey/04dempsey.html

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